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Perhaps the least inconspicuous of tide pool organisms, the brightly colored Hopkin’s rose nudibranch is a favorite find for intertidal explorers of all ages. The rosy nudibranchs, as they are also known, range from the Oregon coast to Baja California and garner their pink hue
from their distinct bryozoan food source, Eurystomella bilabiata. Bryozoans are a small, colonial organism found encrusting rocks in the lower intertidal zone. Like many nudibranchs, they steal the calcareous spicules of their prey and place them into their feathery cerata appendages. When not consuming bryozoans, rosy nudibranchs are carnivorous and utilize their sensory organs known as rhinophores to locate their prey. Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, CA USA

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Michael Ready
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Perhaps the least inconspicuous of tide pool organisms, the brightly colored Hopkin’s rose nudibranch is a favorite find for intertidal explorers of all ages. The rosy nudibranchs, as they are also known, range from the Oregon coast to Baja California and garner their pink hue<br />
from their distinct bryozoan food source, Eurystomella bilabiata. Bryozoans are a small, colonial organism found encrusting rocks in the lower intertidal zone. Like many nudibranchs, they steal the calcareous spicules of their prey and place them into their feathery cerata appendages. When not consuming bryozoans, rosy nudibranchs are carnivorous and utilize their sensory organs known as rhinophores to locate their prey. Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, CA USA